News Sports Health Technology Entertainment World Africa andriod Window
How receptors for medicines work inside cells
PHYS
Posted on: September 5th 2017
125 Pageviews
© PHYS

G protein-coupled receptors are the key target of a large number of drugs. Würzburg scientists have now been able to show more precisely how these receptors act in the cell interior.

The human genome encodes hundreds of G  (GPCRs). These form the largest group of  through which hormones and neurotransmitters exert their functions on our cells. Therefore, they are of highest importance as drug targets: around half of all prescribed drugs act on these receptors - and thus GPCRs help in the treatment of widespread diseases such as hypertension, asthma or Parkinson.

For a long time, scientists were convinced that GPCRs sit at the cell surface and only from there influence the activity of the cell via activation of various intracellular signalling cascades. This belief has been shaken by a series of recent studies. These studies suggest that GPCRs are also active in the . Researchers led by Professor Davide Calebiro of the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology and the Bio-Imaging Center of the University of Würzburg have now provided important support to this theory. The results of their work are presented in the current issue of the journal Nature Communications.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE
Loading...
MORE FROM Health
keepuplive
NACA, States To Enroll 500,000 On HIV Treatment
source the eagleonline
keepuplive
With Stricter Guidelines, Do You Have High Blood Pressure Now?
source npr
keepuplive
World Diabetes day
source iol